Jan 212016
 

 

We helped a buyer with this home sold as a short sale. They got a deal on 24 acres and this home.

We helped a buyer with this home sold as a short sale. They got a deal on 24 acres and this home.

What Is A Short Sale? You’ve probably heard the term, especially if you are looking in the home buyers market, of a home that is listed as a ‘short sale’. It sometimes can be described as a ‘pre-foreclosure’ as well, but basically it means the same thing as while a home is listed as a short sale the foreclosure process is continuing to be executed by the lender.

A few years ago this wasn’t something you saw on the market, but times have changed and as we all know things have been hard for a lot of people who own homes. So the banks (strongly encouraged by the federal government with HAFA) have worked on options for people who owe more on their home than it can sell for (short of the current amount of the mortgage). So a home that is listed as a short sale or possible short sale is usually a homeowner who cannot afford the home but is trying to avoid foreclosure.

Each bank has their own approach for short sales so this is just a general description of what to consider when shopping for homes. This information is mostly from our own experience in the short sales we’ve worked with so your own experience will vary, based on the lender involved and the agent’s due diligence.

First off, short sales usually take a long time (despite the common name). This is because all offers must be approved by the lender, and more commonly the investor who holds the note for the loan and signed off by many different people. Some banks are better than others at working with the seller and their agent. If the approval is still in process, it’s going to be a bit longer of a wait.

TIP: When considering making an offer on a short sale, find out if the hardship package has been submitted and approved. That can speed up the process of the lender approval of your offer.

In most cases you’ll find these homes are being sold ‘As Is’ so you are looking at a probable ‘fixer upper’. But depending on how long the home has been on the market, the general condition of the property, and the area sales numbers, you might find a really great deal on a nice home because the lender is more willing to accept lower offers at that point. The number one thing to have if you decide to make an offer on a short sale is; patience. So what we find is most often buyers that are ready to move right now will find a short sale will not work due to time constraints. In the end most short sales are sold to investors with cash offers.

But if you have the time, or are looking for investment property, a short sale can be worth considering. Just understand that there are often delays that can take up to 6 months or more to get a deal closed. And it’s not unheard of for a lender to change their mind and end up rejecting an offer they accepted a few weeks earlier. So be ready for anything if you decide to make an offer on a short sale. But you just might be rewarded with a really good deal.

Questions on a particular short sale home in the Indy West Metro Area? Give us a call at 317-563-1110 or use our handy Contact Form. We can help guide you through this maze and see if you think this is worth a try for you. Just be ready to hurry up and wait.

May 022011
 

We often are told by potential homebuyers, “We want to find a really great deal”. Well that makes sense, you’re shopping for the most expensive item you’ll buy during your lifetime, why not get a great deal too.

So in today’s market, that usually starts them looking at the homes everyone thinks are steals, foreclosed homes. Lets look a little deeper on what these deals are all about.

First, we break these into 2 categories, foreclosed homes and pre-foreclosed homes.

Pre-foreclosed homes are commonly referred to as short sales, possible short sales, or even pre-foreclosed homes. In general what this means is the owner is unable to pay the note holder of the mortgage (typically a bank) and the property is worth less than the amount owed. Various rules apply to what the homes status is depending on the note holders requirements are for short sale but often the owner must be behind on at least 3 payments and be able to document why they cannot pay the mortgage. This is known as a ‘hardship package’. If the requirements are met then the home is marketed as a short sale. For buyers these can be good deals, but the purchase process requires a lot of patience. There is a lot of back and forth negotiations with the purchase of a short sale and for a REALTOR it can be a challenge to get everything to work out, and each bank handles these completely differently. But it is doable and the federal government is working on ways to smooth this out. Short sales could be a long topic on their own so for now lets just say if you are not in a hurry, these can be a deal.

Foreclosed homes fall into a few different categories depending on who was the note holder of the home. The most common are listed as HUD’s, Homepath’s , & REO’s.

HUD homes were financed via a federal entity such as FHA, VA, USDA, etc. When the property is foreclosed the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development takes over the home and it is then listed for sale with a processing service that works with a set of rules on how to sell the home. But the basics are it’s sold with a bidding process, kind of like the Ebay of home sales. These properties can be really nice or a total mess. But once you find one the purchase process can be pretty straightforward.

Foreclosed homes that had mortgages with Fannie Mae are now usually marketed as Homepath homes. These can be similar to HUD homes (Fannie & Freddie are quasi federal entities). Lately the Homepath homes are often marketed towards first time homebuyers with deals such as $100 down and escrows allowed to do repairs to the home. These homes can be very affordable and easier to purchase than HUD properties.

Finally there are the Real Estate Owned (REO) properties. (Nothing to do with the great rock band REO Speedwagon). These are listed like normal homes except the owner you negotiate with is the bank that was the mortgage holder. These can range from really nice homes to those referred too as “distressed”. Because you are negotiating directly with the owner, the purchase process is similar to a normal home sale. The question of how good a deal this can be depends on the status of the banks inventory and how bad they need to unload the home. But generally these will be sold for less than the general area market value so these can be a good deal for a buyer to consider.

This is a general high level overview of what deals a buyer can find. Each of these are more complex subjects so you want to make sure and have a professional REALTOR help you with these purchases as the respective sellers will pay their fees. But to summarize each, short sales require patience, bidding on HUD’s can be like playing the lottery, Homepath homes can have great financing options, and REO’s are more like normal deals that often are discounted, depending on the banks situation.

Ready to get a deal? Give The Derrick Team a call today and we’ll help you find the best fit for you.

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