Apr 012011
 

These are several videos of the fun I shot at this years Dogtona on March 19th. As you can see it’s a great day for the dogs and the owners who tag along. We love being a part of the great event in Hendricks County.

Mar 302011
 
What were they thinking?

What were they thinking?

While I am a fan of some shows on HGTV in real estate we often see houses with a condition I like to call ‘HGTV Syndrome’. Sometimes it is done in moderation and with good taste. But more often it is more of good intentions gone badly.

What is ‘It’ you ask? ‘It’ is the trendy ideas that come from some shows on HGTV (and other channels as well), that give the homeowner the idea that they know how to make their home look like the one on TV. It doesn’t help that we have stores full of stuff to sell homeowners to do these ‘ideas’ like Lowes, Home Depot, etc in every major metro area that of course also promote ‘It’, and the fact that anyone can do it.

In most cases the worst damage is in the form of wild paint jobs, which will just take someone, sometimes a professional, to undo. This would be a house with a mild case of HGTV Syndrome. In the worst cases, you’ll find the home will do very badly in the home inspection. Home Inspectors find things all the time that are obviously a DIY job and in some cases very dangerous such as bad electrical wiring work.

So when showing homes to our buyers, The Derrick Team will always point out when we see the home is suffering from HGTV Syndrome. The question at that point is how hard will it be to repair the damage.

We personally talked to a homeowner that purchased a home in Avon used in Trading Spaces. He said it took a lot of work to cure that home of its HGTV Syndrome. So beware if you get the urge to decorate after watching a TV show. You might end up making your home worth less or even too sick to sell!

If you are thinking of doing some updates, give us a call or text today at 317-563-1110. We’ll be glad to come take a look at your ideas and let you know how that might effect your homes value. It’s what we do for our clients, for free!

Mar 232011
 

You’ve talked to a lender and now know what your price range is for purchasing a home. You’re working with a REALTOR to find that ‘just right’ home you’ve always wanted.

While your doing the search, and especially when you’ve found one and made an offer, there are very important steps to make sure you still qualify at the closing (purchase) of the home.

First things first:

You absolutely should not take out any additional credit or even have an inquiry into your credit report from the time you start the loan application until after you have completed the purchase (closing is when you sign all the documents and make it official).

Make sure you don’t:

  • Go on a spending spree for new furniture, new window treatments, etc., and raise your credit balance above 30% of your limit. Revolving credit balance (credit cards, store accounts, etc.) is acceptable if it stays below 30%. Also watch and make sure your CC holder doesn’t drop your limit on a card thus pushing you over that percentage.
  • Get ANY “Buy now –Pay later” type of financing, this really hits your credit report as maxed out credit account (as in %100!).
  • Co-sign on a loan for anyone else as his or her credit then becomes part of yours (which may be really bad, why else would you be co-signing?)
  • Go shopping for large purchase items such as a car, truck, or fishing boat, even if not ready to buy yet. The dealer will pull your credit and that will result in an additional inquiry on your credit report.
  • Miss or pay late ANY payments!

Best if you do:

  • Carefully document all deposits into your bank and investment accounts. Lenders want to know where you get additional funds once the process is started (making sure your money is legit). This includes any items you sell for a few hundred dollars to your friend or neighbor. Check with the lender if someone is offering a cash gift to help, sometimes that’s not allowed or can only be a certain amount or percentage.
  • Keep an eye on mortgage rates. Banks are competitive and if you see a better deal at another lender, negotiate with your lender and they will probably work with you to keep your business.
  • Keep your down payment money intact, or add to it. More available cash can sometimes help at negotiations with a seller.

We’ve seen deals fall apart more than once when the buyers didn’t follow the ‘Don’ts’ from the list. You should always be smart with your credit but it’s VERY important when getting a mortgage from a lender. Ask your lender about these items and watch them nod their head (except the part about getting a better deal). If you really feel the need to spend, at least wait until the day AFTER closing!

Mar 092011
 

Leave-it competition – The dogs are not supposed to eat the hot dog!

Feb 142011
 

IMG_20150212_165246So you contracted with a real estate agent to sell your home, and it didn’t sell. Why?

Well that’s not always simple question. Many factors could have impacted this so we’ll just look at the basics.

1. Did you price your home for the current market?

Your agent should have given you a Comparative Market Analysis report when you first put your home on the market. Did you look it over carefully? The Derrick Team will give you a report with a range. Based on your personal motivation, you start with a price in the range of what the CMA shows. For example, if you are highly motivated, set the price in the low range. Good pricing gives you an edge over the competition in the market. Your agent should have kept giving you reports on area activity. But it’s up to you to determine your motivation. If your home didn’t sell, this is the first thing to reexamine before putting your home back on the market.

2. Did you properly prepare your home to show?

Your agent should have suggested how you should prepare for open houses and showings. The rule of thumb: Clean and Neat. If your home shows great, you’ll have a much better chance of getting offers.

3. Did your agent aggressively market your home?

Were you happy with how your agent advertised to attract buyers? Some agents will tell you putting your home on the MIBOR Broker Listing Service (BLS) and a sign in the yard is all you need. Occasionally this does work. But you have a much better chance of attracting more buyers and getting better offers if your home is actively marketed. The Derrick Team excels in Above and Beyond Marketing.

If you feel you are OK with # 1 & 2, then examine if you think your agent did # 3 to your satisfaction. If not, check out what The Derrick Team can do for you. Look at our web site: http://derrickteam.com/ for more details. Then give us a call at 317.563.1110 or shoot us an email at DerrickTeam@DerrickTeam.com.

Feb 122011
 

The Craftsman style home was a revolution in American architectural design built all over the nation in the early 1900’s. The name comes from a popular magazine published in the early 1900s by furniture maker Gustav Stickley called The Craftsman.

CraftsmanStyleHome

This was supposed to be a Sears catalog order home built in the early 1900’s.

A typical Craftsman style home is characterized by having low, gentle sloping roofs, and while generally being only one story tall many also have upper levels with rooms and dormers like a story and a half house has. The house usually has wide eaves and a large deep porch on the front to enjoy the cool summer evenings. The Craftsman home is designed to be a solid, simple dwelling with some Arts & Crafts styles built in.

In the early 1900’s homes by top designers could be expensive for the common folk, but there were plenty of affordable mass-produced kit homes that allowed everyone to own a piece of the lifestyle. Sears Robuck & Co. sold its own popular kit homes in bungalow and foursquare style that still can be found all across America. Drive through any neighborhood built in the early 1900’s and you’ll probably see some classic examples of Craftsman style homes. The home pictured was built in the early 1900’s by the same person that built the ones to the north and south of its location. Each home is a different version of Craftsman style popular at the time.

Today some builders are offering models that use elements of the Craftsman style in their design, but you know they don’t have that solid, unique structure found in the charming older homes from the original era. For those whom appreciate older homes with style, a Craftsman is a good one to look into for your next home.

Call or text The Derrick Team today with any style home you have and we’ll be glad to answer your real estate buying or selling questions. We work 7 days a week including evenings!

Feb 072011
 

The first settlement of Avon was about the year 1830. It was dense forest everywhere. In small clearings little cabins of round logs sprang up and in a very short time this became a “neighborhood.”

In 1833 the first of many post offices were setup and the area was known as Hampton. Later in 1852 it was called White Lick.

In 1867 a Mr. Smoot ran a store and a headed petition to Washington for a post office but no name was suggested for the new office, so the authorities used the first name on the petition. When the commission, dated April 28, 1868, reached him the listed name was Smootsdell.

When the Indianapolis & St. Louis railroad was being surveyed the man marking the stakes made fun of the name of our post office, and said, “I’ll name the town.” He penciled “New Philadelphia” on a stake and drove it in. When the road was completed the company drove another stake with “Avon” painted on it. The people liked the name and petitioned to have the post office name changed to Avon.

So we really don’t know why Avon came up as a name for the road company but that’s why Avon is the official name now. I do think it has a better ring than Smootsdell (sorry Mr. Smoot).

Information from “The History of Hendricks County” John V. Hadley 1914

Feb 032011
 

While the local Indy Metro area is starting a slow rebound, it’s still a buyers market in this area. Home prices are very slowly starting to recover towards 2007 highs but more importantly interest rates are still pretty low for mortgage loans.

So what’s your first step? Shop for a lender with good rates and offer different options for loans. That’s important because different loans help if there is a special requirement or need for the home you decide to purchase. For example you find the home you want in the perfect location but it needs a little fixing up. An FHA 203K loan can be a great option there.

Little low on cash? Find a lender willing to work with an Indiana Housing & Community Development Authority first time home buyer programs which can help with the down payment and loan rates. Another option for homes that qualify is the USDA no-money down program. This is for more rural homes such as our listings in Bainbridge and Danville. You can check homes eligibility at this web site.

Don’t wait too long. ½ an interest point in your loan can cost you thousands of dollars over the life of the mortgage. And in a buyers market you have the advantage in many homes to select from which could save you money vs. 12 to 18 months from now.

Have a home to sell? Consider selling it at a low price to sell quickly so you can buy your new home and save on the home price and the loan interest which could easily more than make up the difference.

Call or text The Derrick Team with any questions and we can begin to help you find that perfect home today! We work 7 days a week, evenings too!

Feb 022011
 

The Derrick Team ~ Listing Leaders

Give us a call to sell your home or buy a home today!

Jan 172011
 

A deed is a document that conveys an ownership interest in real property from one person or entity to another. The specific type of deed that is utilized to transfer an ownership interest will depend on many factors including: the jurisdiction, the circumstances, the intent of the parties, and the legal capacity of the grantor. Below is a brief overview of several types of deeds and how they are used to convey ownership interests in property.

An owner’s title insurance policy protects the buyer should a covered matter or title problem arise. It is purchased for a onetime fee at closing and lasts for as long as you or your heirs have an interest in the property.

But does he have title insurance?

But does he have title insurance?

General Warranty Deed
This type of deed is typically used to convey ownership in real estate transactions in which the grantor fully warrants good and clear title to the property. The Grantor (seller) makes certain warranties or promises to the Grantee (buyer) including, but not limited to: the Grantor has the rights in the property being transferred, that Grantor has the right to convey the property and that the property is free from liens or claims of third parties.

Special (or Limited) Warranty Deed
A deed often given by fiduciaries that hold property of behalf of others (trustees, personal representatives, guardians) as well as builders, and lenders that typically have owned a property for a relatively short period of time. A special or limited warranty deed only warrants that the grantor has not impaired the title during their ownership of the property. It is not a warranty against defects or claims against the property that arose prior to the grantor’s ownership nor does it obligate the grantor to do anything further once the title is transferred.

Quit Claim Deed
A deed of conveyance that operates as a release, it is intended to pass any title, interest, or claim which the grantor may have in real property, but does not warrant the validity of the grantor’s interest in the real property. A quit claim deed is often used when a family member conveys title to another family member and it is commonly used by divorcing couples where one spouse signs all his or her rights in a property to the other spouse.

Certificate of Sale/Tax Deed
A Certificate of Sale is issued to the winning bidder at a judicial foreclosure sale. The document indicates that the bidder will receive the property’s title once any conditions of the sale are completed and confirmed by the court. A tax deed is an instrument used to convey legal title to property sold by a governmental taxing authority for nonpayment of property taxes.

Deed-in-lieu of foreclosure
A deed-in-lieu of foreclosure is given by the owner of mortgaged property to the holder of the mortgage when the mortgage is in default and foreclosure is threatened. The actual deed utilized is oftentimes a quit claim deed, and it is given to a lender as an alternative to foreclosure.

Deed of Trust
A deed of trust gives a lender a security interest in your home, just like a mortgage. In exchange, you give the bank a deed of trust, which says that if you default in repaying the loan, the bank can foreclose on your home and sell it to pay off the loan.

Trustee’s Deed
The document that is given to the individual or entity that successfully bids at a Trustee’s Sale and purchases the foreclosed property. This document transfers ownership and the sale must be recorded with the county recorder in the county in which the property is located. (A trustee’s deed is also an instrument that can also be used to convey property out of a trust.)

This information provided by Larry Coplen at First American Title Insurance Company in Avon.

The Derrick Team is not associated with First American Title Insurance Company but is providing this information to help you understand deeds for buying or selling property. This information is not provided as professional advice. When you’re ready to buy a house, give us a call or text at 317-563-1110. As a buyer being represented by a Realtor costs you noting!

Jan 152011
 

This is a little video clip of preparing to move a doorway to the kitchen. I had to move the basement stairs so I removed an old pantry. Then I had to remove the wall for the new doorway. The electric wire was disconnected by the way…

 

Dec 272010
 

One of those interesting places in Hendricks County that you may not even know about, the Hendricks County Historical Museum is a great place to check out interesting history about the local area. The museum is located in the former Sheriff’s Residence and jail. Built in 1866 at an approximate cost of $30,000, it served as the county jail until 1974. The building is now owned and maintained by the county. The museum is filled with artifacts dating back to 1866 when the Museum served as the Sheriff’s Residence and jail.

Connie and I have recently joined and I will be helping with updates to the web site and photography in the museum. As a local history buff I find all the stuff in there fasinating! The museum is normally open every Saturday from 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM except for January & February so it is now closed for 2010. During these months certain rooms are chosen for updates and /or remodeling.

The Military Room is slated to be redone in 2011 so I went over the other day and took these pictures of what it looks like now:

The museum reopens March 5th so put that on your calendar to see the latest and greatest of our local history!

Dec 212010
 

If you are planning on buying a home soon, or even a year or two from now, here are some good things to know about qualifying for a loan. This information comes from a certified trainer for “FICO Scoring 101”.

The FICO score is based on five different weighted factors:

▪ Payment History: The record of your on time and late payments
▪ Amounts Owed: Your credit limit minus the amount you owe for each account
▪ Length of History: The average length of time of all open accounts
▪ New Credit: Records of inquiries, new account openings
▪ Type of Credit: Mortgages, installment loans, revolving accounts etc

Easy Ways To Improve Your Credit Score:

With all the different kinds of information that credit scoring models incorporate, numerous tactics for improving scores are available. However, any action to improve a score must be taken judiciously: some actions aimed at improving your score may actually make it worse. Precision Credit Group can help you determine which steps will help your credit the most, without doing harm.

Many individuals reap significant benefits by properly employing these simple FICO score improvement techniques:

▪ Make payments on time, especially to installment and revolving accounts, as these report to the bureaus monthly
▪ Do not apply for any new credit cards or loans
▪ Pay credit card balances down to 30% of your credit limit or less
▪ Make sure your credit card company reports a limit
▪ Keep 3-5 open and active accounts in good standing on your credit report
▪ Review your credit report every year

This information provided by Ryan D. Keip, Owner of Precision Credit Group

The Derrick Team is not associated with Precision Credit Group but is providing these tips to help you get ready to buy your home. This information is not provided as professional advice. Consult with your lender if you have any questions on your FICO score and what you need to do to qualify for a loan as not all lenders follow the same guidelines.

When you’re ready to buy a house, give us a call. Being represented by a Realtor costs you nothing!

 

Dec 052010
 

We just received the first real snowfall in central Indiana, 2 weeks before the official start of winter, but in Real Estate we are already thinking spring! And if you are planning on putting your home on the market next spring you should start working right now.

First let’s explain the real time frame from which real estate works. Most people know that annual property sale transactions peak during the spring. We can verify that as springtime is typically real estates busiest period. But actually buyers start looking seriously soon after the first of the year, in the middle of winter. Sitting around on cold snowy days, searching available homes on the Internet, and getting ideas what to look at as soon as the weather is a little warmer, as in maybe the January thaw we often see here in the Midwest. So the best bet to get those early buyers is to have your home on the market no later than the third week in January. The earlier the better!

The reason you need to get started today is you probably have a few things to do to spruce up your home before you get it listed on the market. And what better time for indoor projects than the cold days of winter. Maybe a room needs a quick paint job. That loose railing you’ve been meaning to repair. A broken light fixture that needs replaced. You want to have all those things done before the first showing. It is hard to explain to buyers that this or that will be done soon, as they base everything on what they see right in front of them. And in some cases what they see can be potential deal killers.

So if you are planning to sell your home, your spring season starts right now. Feel free to contact The Derrick Team at 317.563.1110 with any questions. We’d be happy to come by and look at your home and offer suggestions on getting it ready to show. We’ll also do a Free Comparative Market Analysis of your home with no obligations to use us when you’re ready to sell. But we’re sure when you see The Derrick Team Marketing Advantage, you’ll realize we can do the most for you to give your home the exposure it needs to find buyers looking on those cold winter days in January.

Also be sure and download our free booklet Some Tips For Preparing Your Home To Sell

Nov 132010
 
Edison & his light bulb.

Edison & his light bulb.

On a cold night on January 9th, 1896, the switch was thrown in Danville and the streets lit up with electric street lamps. Danville Electric Light Company was the first power company in Hendricks County and that night the snow covered ground reflected the light and lit up the town like never before, even though a section of lights north of Main Street failed to light up.

In addition to the street lights the power company provided power for lights in businesses and more affluent homeowners who could afford the new fangled “light in a bottle”. In March of that year the company ran and ad in the local paper, the Danville Republican, to explain to consumers that they were to turn off the lights during the day as no one had used lights before. Many people thought the power company did that for them (at the time meters were not used as consumers paid a flat monthly fee per light).

Initially most power was provided in towns by smaller local power companies. As the electric interurban and the Indianapolis & Eastern Traction Company had commuter train lines in Hendricks County with power plants to drive the electric trains, they often sold excess power to communities as well. Around 1935 a group formed the Hendricks County REMC to provide power under the Rural Electrification Act to those too far from towns to be serviced by local power companies.

Eventually all the private companies were bought and sold and today most of Hendricks County homes and businesses either receives electric power from Duke Energy or Hendricks Power Cooperative (the REMC). And today’s savvy consumers know to turn off those lights to slow down the meter!

Some information in this post from “The History of Hendricks County 1914-1976”.

Oct 292010
 

 How important is it for you to sell your home?

There are different types of Realtor services available to those who are looking to sell your home. Each one has a general base commission rate that is determined by what they provide the seller to help get the property sold. But what most people don’t realize is the whole commission that is charged is normally split 4 ways.

RallyAwardFirst you have the split between what the listing broker/agent and what selling broker/agent (who brings the buyer) receives at the closing. The second split is referred to as the Broker-Agent Commission (BAC). The BAC is important as this amount attracts the agents with buyers to your property. A lower BAC could make a difference in a sale as an agent may guide a buyer to a similar listing with a higher BAC. So a home with a 3.5 BAC will be considered more often than homes with 2.5 or even 3.0. We always recommend at least a 3.5 in this market and even 4.0 if you really want motivated agents showing your property in today’s market.

Second each of these halves are split again in a predetermined percentage between each agent and their associated broker. In most cases this is a 50/50 split so the listing agent and the selling agent actually end up with about ¼ each of the total commission.

In the Indy Metro area you will find that most full service brokers generally start at a 7% commission and reduce them on a sliding scale depending on the properties listed sales price. Your discount brokers will often reduce this down to 4 to 5% but offer a much lower BAC to agents bringing the buyers.

Now keep in mind the agent who is working the hardest to sell your home is only getting ¼ of the commission. So the selling agents income difference between 5 & 7% on a $100,000 sale is $500. Do you really think that the agent with the lower commission rate can afford to invest as much time and money in marketing your home as would a full service broker? Also note, a well marketed home with more buyers looking at it typically gets a higher sales price.

So again we ask: How important is it for you to sell your home?

Carpenter Realtors is a full service broker that provides a wealth of marketing tools including the exclusive Home Marketing System for all their agents.

The Derrick Team uses these tools and even more (like dedicated listing web sites) to achieve maximum exposure of your property to buyers in today’s market. Call or text us today to find out more at 317.563.1110. We work 7 days a week, evenings too!

Oct 062010
 

BrookBendSOLDIn the first part we discussed the types of REALTOR®s in this area. Now as you interview agents, here are some of the things to ask to see how agents work for you to sell your property.

Things to ask a REALTOR®

What is all the information you will put on the MLS?

How many pictures do you put on the MLS?

Can I see some examples of pictures you used before?

What do you offer as the BAC?

What kind of print advertising do you do?

Do you distribute books or flyers with our properties information?

Do you offer flyers for people driving by?

How will you show our property?

Is there someone else available for us to talk to if you are not available?

Do you offer books with additional information for showings?

Will you get feedback and follow up with agents who show our property?

How often are you willing to do open houses?

What kind of Internet marketing do you provide?

What kind of Internet presence do you or your broker have?

Do you provide Internet traffic reports on our property?

Will you provide a dedicated web site for our property?

These are just some of the things a good REALTOR® should be willing to do to help you sell your property. Be sure and ask for examples and give them some concerns you might have. If you don’t feel comfortable with all their answers, be sure to interview some more agents before making your choice. You want to sell your property and should want the best REALTOR® doing it!

The Derrick Team would love to answer these questions and more as you go through your selection process. We feel confident that we can market your home with the best tools and more. Give us a call or text today at 317.563.1110 to setup a no pressure, no obligation discussion on selling your property. We’ll do a free Competitive Market Analysis and give you tips on what your property needs to sell in the current market.

Sep 292010
 

So you are getting ready to list, or relist your property with a professional REALTOR®, here is a rundown on what to look for as your options.

Listing Service

This is a company that charges a flat fee to provide you the services of a broker to assist you in selling your home. This is only an option if you are willing to do most of the work yourself. They do the minimum amount of work to place your home in the local Multiple Listing Service (MLS). After that you’re on your own to market, show, and hold open houses. You have to determine your BAC (what an agent who sells your home gets) which can determine how many showings you get. If your property doesn’t sell, you’re out their fee and all your time and money spent marketing the property.

Discount Broker

This is an agency where you will have an assigned agent to work with you to list your property and only charge you a discounted fee (typically 5 to 6 %) if your home sells. They will provide you the necessary service to list your home in the MLS, usually show your home or provide a method for other agents to show the home, and maybe even do some limited marketing. They might do open houses if you request it but probably won’t offer that willingly. They will list on the MLS at a reduced BAC rate depending on what the commission is set at, which can sometimes impact the amount of showings. The better ones will offer some extra marketing such as virtual tours but don’t count on it.

20150811_150744Full Service Broker

This is an agency where you will have an assigned agent to work with you to list your property and charge you a fee based on several factors for the area (typically 7 % or more in the metro west area) if your home sells. They will provide you the necessary service to list your home in the MLS, show your home and provide a secure method for other agents to show the home, and will do much more marketing. They typically will provide a improved web search ability to help sell your home on the Internet (where 90% of buyers start their home search) and some additional print marketing such as flyers and books for potential buyers to have. Most will have their own sections in the newspaper to advertise homes and open houses. They will offer the highest BAC which draws other agents to show your property. And most will offer to do open houses if you want.

So to summarize:

Listing Service: Flat fee, home on MLS, sign in yard (you pay for it), show the home yourself, you pay out the BAC, out time and money if home doesn’t sell.

Discount Broker: Lower commission, home on MLS, sign in yard, take care of showings, lower BAC, some marketing and maybe open houses. No charge to you if home doesn’t sell.

Full Service Broker: Standard commission, home on MLS, sign(s) in yard, take care of showings, offer attractive BAC, extensive marketing and open houses. No charge to you if home doesn’t sell. They will work the hardest to sell your property as they will put more time and money into selling your property and will get nothing in return if they don’t succeed!

The market for selling homes is very competitive, especially in this current economy. You need to compete with homes being marketed by Full Service Brokers. Is it worth the risk to try saving a few dollars in a large financial transaction when there is so much at stake? Contact  your Full Service (and more) REALTOR®s, The Derrick Team today to find out more what we can do for you. Call or text 317-563-1110 anytime, we work 7 days a week, evenings too.

Sep 252010
 

logoWhen Indiana was first created in 1819 Hendricks County was all wilderness and inhabited by the Delaware Indians who mainly used it for hunting ground. The Indians had no major trails or villages in the county so they only came and hunted the area and then left. Much of the northern part of the county was swampland so the first settlers found the best area to settle in was the southern sections.

In 1820 many new settlers to the area came from Guilford, North Carolina and settled on White Lick Creek and used the abundant timber to build log cabins. They named the township that was formed in the area Guilford after where they had migrated from. As many of the early settlers were Quakers, they lived a simple life and dressed in rather plain looking clothes.

As more settlers moved into the area, they saw the beauty of the wilderness occupied by the plain people and came up with the name of Plainfield to describe what they saw. Plainfield was first incorporated in 1839 with an election of 42 votes. Later the incorporation charter was given up in favor of township rule. In 1904 Plainfield was again incorporated and has continued to grow as the largest town in Hendricks County.

Sep 132010
 

Rockwood Today

This landmark in Avon has a long history and is located on 625E just west of Stratford of Avon, this 3 story home has 4800 sq ft of living area plus a large basement.

The History

The 70 acres that belonged to Rockwood were purchased July 30, 1907 for $2,500 by Drs Thomas J. Beasley and Harvey A. Moore who planned to produce the finest treatment for tuberculosis patients which was a serious disease at the time. About 20 physicians and Merchants National Bank in Indianapolis were financial backers of this enterprise as everyone saw this as a breakthrough method of treating TB. At the age of 26, Dr. Beasley was director and president of Rockwood and he was already well-known in the early 1900s for his successful treatment of TB.

Rockwood in the early 1900’s

Patients at Rockwood endured the cold winters living in small unheated cottages with “window sides,” that were opened while patients slept. The idea being the cold fresh air was important to treat the disease. The accepted practice of the time was to send patients to hot, dry, western states and Dr. Beasley as saw this as too outlandish. His idea was to treat patients in the climate in which it was originally contracted and he thought the clean country air in Avon was a perfect place for treatment.

Rockwood produced nearly all its own food and patients were provided full, balanced meals plus extra meals of raw eggs and fruit. All the vegetables, meat, and dairy products including the maple syrup came from the rich farmlands in the “White Lick Valley,” which Rockwood owned. Ice for summer use was cut from Whitelick Creek and stored in sawdust. Charges for a double cottage were $18 a week and $25 a week for a private cottage.

From the Indiana Medical Journal May 1908:
Much can be done by private sanitariums on a small scale. The Rock wood Tuberculosis Sanitarium near Danville Indiana, eighteen miles west of Indianapolis is built upon the bungaloo style posts and a roof with properly adjusted screens. The results have been excellent while the prices are moderate not more than half as much as the cost of a trained nurse and physician. The State Commission would do well to study the method of construction and care taking of the Rockwood sanitarium as an example of the simplicity economy and success of the Bungaloo system.

But all was not well. The initial mortality rate of TB patients at Rockwood was extremely high; 34.9 per cent died in a one-month period. Those statistics couldn’t have helped the sanitarium’s reputation. Around the same time  new drugs and vaccines made recovery quicker and the need for long therapy the sanitarium provided was lessening by 1910. So advances in treatments doomed Rockwood’s success and it closed it’s doors and was sold in 1913 just  6 years after is opened.

After it closed in 1913 Charles and Violet Isaacs purchased the property west of CR 625E which has the original three-story building that was the recreation center and living quarters for Rockwood’s interns, nurses and servants (center of 1900’s photo above). The building was a mess and they lived in the servants quarters while they fixed the home and added the south and north wings of the current home. Most of the cottages were purchased and moved off the property but 2 old outbuildings are still there on what is now a 3 acre lot.

If you would like to find a classic local home give The Derrick Team a call today at 317.563.1110.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Some information for this post found in “The History of Hendricks County 1914~1976” available for purchase at The Hendricks County Historical Society
Bottom photo from The Hendricks County Historical Society archives.

%d bloggers like this: