Oct 052014
 

This style of home comes from the basic need for shelter. National-style homes are less adorned than the European Victorian style homes. In early America, builders copied from Native American and tended to build these homes more for utilitarian needs.

The style is typically utilizes rectangular shapes with side-gabled roofs or square layouts with pyramidal roofs. The gabled-front-and-wing style this home in Danville is in the subset of the National style known as “Massed” plan styles, recognized by a layout more than one room deep, often sport side gables and shed-roofed porches.

National style homes have been around since the pre-railroad days but the style is still used as the basis for new custom built homes and can be found all over the country.

As history buffs we love to help sellers with older historic homes. But then we love to help everyone sell their home, no matter which century it was built. Call or text The Derrick Team today at 317-563-1110 with any of your real estate needs.

Sep 222014
 

1513 Forest Commons DrFrench Provincial or more commonly referred to as French Country style homes come from a style of French countryside homes originating in the 1600’s. Balance and symmetry are the ruling characteristics of this formal style. Originally the homes were often brick with detailing in copper or slate but today more modern roofing materials are used and copper will only be a minor detail if used at all. Windows and chimneys are symmetrical and perfectly balanced, at least in original versions of the style but with modern homes the balance gives way to interior layouts and attached garages. Defining features often include a steep, high, hip roof; balcony and porch balustrades; rectangle doors set in arched openings; and double French windows with shutters but again modern versions usually have only some of these features.

The truer French Provincial homes will be older homes built in America after the world wars in 1920’s & 1960s by returning soldiers. Now elements of the style are used in expensive custom homes as a way to stand out from more common modern building styles.

Whether fancy or traditional american style, we love to help everyone sell their home, no matter which century it was built. Call or text The Derrick Team today at 317-563-1110 with any of your real estate needs.

Jumbo-2015-Sales

Sold this French Provencal home in 2015

 

Feb 122011
 

The Craftsman style home was a revolution in American architectural design built all over the nation in the early 1900’s. The name comes from a popular magazine published in the early 1900s by furniture maker Gustav Stickley called The Craftsman.

CraftsmanStyleHome

This was supposed to be a Sears catalog order home built in the early 1900’s.

A typical Craftsman style home is characterized by having low, gentle sloping roofs, and while generally being only one story tall many also have upper levels with rooms and dormers like a story and a half house has. The house usually has wide eaves and a large deep porch on the front to enjoy the cool summer evenings. The Craftsman home is designed to be a solid, simple dwelling with some Arts & Crafts styles built in.

In the early 1900’s homes by top designers could be expensive for the common folk, but there were plenty of affordable mass-produced kit homes that allowed everyone to own a piece of the lifestyle. Sears Robuck & Co. sold its own popular kit homes in bungalow and foursquare style that still can be found all across America. Drive through any neighborhood built in the early 1900’s and you’ll probably see some classic examples of Craftsman style homes. The home pictured was built in the early 1900’s by the same person that built the ones to the north and south of its location. Each home is a different version of Craftsman style popular at the time.

Today some builders are offering models that use elements of the Craftsman style in their design, but you know they don’t have that solid, unique structure found in the charming older homes from the original era. For those whom appreciate older homes with style, a Craftsman is a good one to look into for your next home.

Call or text The Derrick Team today with any style home you have and we’ll be glad to answer your real estate buying or selling questions. We work 7 days a week including evenings!

Sep 132010
 

Rockwood Today

This landmark in Avon has a long history and is located on 625E just west of Stratford of Avon, this 3 story home has 4800 sq ft of living area plus a large basement.

The History

The 70 acres that belonged to Rockwood were purchased July 30, 1907 for $2,500 by Drs Thomas J. Beasley and Harvey A. Moore who planned to produce the finest treatment for tuberculosis patients which was a serious disease at the time. About 20 physicians and Merchants National Bank in Indianapolis were financial backers of this enterprise as everyone saw this as a breakthrough method of treating TB. At the age of 26, Dr. Beasley was director and president of Rockwood and he was already well-known in the early 1900s for his successful treatment of TB.

Rockwood in the early 1900’s

Patients at Rockwood endured the cold winters living in small unheated cottages with “window sides,” that were opened while patients slept. The idea being the cold fresh air was important to treat the disease. The accepted practice of the time was to send patients to hot, dry, western states and Dr. Beasley as saw this as too outlandish. His idea was to treat patients in the climate in which it was originally contracted and he thought the clean country air in Avon was a perfect place for treatment.

Rockwood produced nearly all its own food and patients were provided full, balanced meals plus extra meals of raw eggs and fruit. All the vegetables, meat, and dairy products including the maple syrup came from the rich farmlands in the “White Lick Valley,” which Rockwood owned. Ice for summer use was cut from Whitelick Creek and stored in sawdust. Charges for a double cottage were $18 a week and $25 a week for a private cottage.

From the Indiana Medical Journal May 1908:
Much can be done by private sanitariums on a small scale. The Rock wood Tuberculosis Sanitarium near Danville Indiana, eighteen miles west of Indianapolis is built upon the bungaloo style posts and a roof with properly adjusted screens. The results have been excellent while the prices are moderate not more than half as much as the cost of a trained nurse and physician. The State Commission would do well to study the method of construction and care taking of the Rockwood sanitarium as an example of the simplicity economy and success of the Bungaloo system.

But all was not well. The initial mortality rate of TB patients at Rockwood was extremely high; 34.9 per cent died in a one-month period. Those statistics couldn’t have helped the sanitarium’s reputation. Around the same time  new drugs and vaccines made recovery quicker and the need for long therapy the sanitarium provided was lessening by 1910. So advances in treatments doomed Rockwood’s success and it closed it’s doors and was sold in 1913 just  6 years after is opened.

After it closed in 1913 Charles and Violet Isaacs purchased the property west of CR 625E which has the original three-story building that was the recreation center and living quarters for Rockwood’s interns, nurses and servants (center of 1900’s photo above). The building was a mess and they lived in the servants quarters while they fixed the home and added the south and north wings of the current home. Most of the cottages were purchased and moved off the property but 2 old outbuildings are still there on what is now a 3 acre lot.

If you would like to find a classic local home give The Derrick Team a call today at 317.563.1110.

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Some information for this post found in “The History of Hendricks County 1914~1976” available for purchase at The Hendricks County Historical Society
Bottom photo from The Hendricks County Historical Society archives.

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